University of Illinois and University of Texas partner to host the Summer Internship for Native Americans in Genomics (SING) Workshop

The Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has partnered with the Department of Anthropology and the Native American and Indigenous Studies Program at the University of Texas at Austin to host the Summer Internship for Native Americans in Genomics (SING) Workshop for 2014. The workshop will take place from June 1-7, 2014 on the University of Texas campus in Austin, the week immediately after the Native American Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) meetings take place, also in Austin, Texas.

The goals of the workshop are to facilitate discussions of how genomics research is conducted and to create a support network for Native American students in the sciences. Additional instruction in fundamental concepts and methods in genomics and bioinformatics, including both theoretical aspects and practical laboratory- and computer-based training, will take place.

By combining ethical, legal, and social discussions surrounding historical Native American encounters with science and hands-on training in the latest genomics techniques and analytical programs, the workshop will help prepare participants for future leadership positions in science research and careers.

“The SING workshop fosters a new generation of intellectual leaders with the tools to address the expanding frontiers of genomic science and interactions with society,” says Ripan Malhi, Director of the SING program.

The SING workshop was first held at the IGB in 2011, with 12 attendees and several faculty advisors participating from universities across North America. The upcoming workshop will be the third workshop and will include leading Native American scholars who will be attending the NAISA conference in Austin the week before.

“SING appeals to Native American students and community members who often become interested in genomic research because they see that it presents both risks and opportunities for their tribal communities. SING offers a multi-disciplinary curriculum taught by diverse faculty who recognize that ‘science’ and ‘society’ are not separate, but they continuously shape one another,” says Kim TallBear, SING faculty and associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

The Summer Internship for Native Americans in Genomics (SING) Workshop will take place from June 1-7, 2014, at the University of Texas at Austin. The workshop is open to tribal college students, community college students, university undergraduate students and graduate students, and individuals from Native American communities who would like to continue their education in the sciences. Full details and the online application can be found at http://conferences.igb.illinois.edu/sing/.

About the Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) program at the University of Texas:
The Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) program at the University of Texas at Austin has a global, comparative focus with a particular strength in the Americas.  NAIS fosters and supports teaching and intellectual engagements around the languages, cultures, knowledges, histories, and current political struggles of indigenous peoples. The program is particularly concerned with scholarship and intellectual exchange that contributes to the economic, social, and political advancement of indigenous peoples.  NAIS also contributes to efforts to build a diverse campus by actively working on recruitment of indigenous students and faculty.

For more information, contact the following co-organizers of SING:
Dr. Ripan Malhi (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
malhi@illinois.edu

Dr. Deborah Bolnick (University of Texas at Austin)
deborah.bolnick@austin.utexas.edu

Dr. Kim TallBear (University of Texas at Austin)
kim.tallbear@austin.utexas.edu