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Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology

Where Science Meets Society

Genomes Tell Story of Native American Biological Origins

The first human inhabitants of the Americas lived in a time thousands of years before the first written records, and the story of their transcontinental migration is the subject of ongoing debate and active research.  A study by multi-institutional, international collaboration of researchers, published this week in Science (DOI: 10.1126/science.aab3884) presents strong evidence, gleaned from ancient and modern DNA samples, that the ancestry of all Native Americans can be traced

Monkey Droppings Complement Field Observations, Researchers Report

In South American rainforests, researchers can tell one saddle-back tamarin from another, but what’s more difficult, is to see what the squirrel-sized monkeys are putting in their mouths. Researchers are beginning to rely on their droppings to find out what bugs and other invertebrates the monkeys munch on. 

Genetic study resolves speculation about first people in Americas

Genetic study helps resolve years of speculation about first people in the Americas

A new study could help resolve a longstanding debate about the origins of the first people to inhabit the Americas, researchers report in the journal Science. The study relies on genetic information extracted from the tooth of an adolescent girl who fell into a sinkhole in the Yucatan 12,000 to 13,000 years ago.

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Summer Internship for Native Americans in Genomics (SING) Workshop

The Institute for Genomic Biology will once again be hosting the Summer Internship for Native Americans in Genomics (SING) Workshop. The workshop will take place from August 4-10, 2013, at the IGB to discuss genomics as a tool for Native American communities and assist in the training of Native Americans in the concepts and methods currently used in genomics.

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