Skip to main content

Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology

Where Science Meets Society

New genetic engineering method indispensable biotechnological tool

New method of genetic engineering indispensable tool in biotechnological applications

Research by Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Huimin Zhao and graduate student Behnam Enghiad is pioneering a new method of genetic engineering for basic and applied biological research and medicine. Their work, reported in ACS Synthetic Biology on February 6 [DOI:10.1021/acssynbio.6b00324], has the potential to open new doors in genomic research by improving the precision and adherence of sliced DNA.

Tags

Genome-editing proteins ride a DNA zip line

For gene-editing proteins to be useful in clinical applications, they need to be able to find the specific site they’re supposed to edit among billions of DNA sequences. Using advanced imaging techniques, University of Illinois researchers have found that one class of genome-editing proteins rapidly travels along a strand of DNA like a rider on a zip line – a unique behavior among documented DNA-binding proteins.

Global Biofoundry Consortium embraces grand challenge

Synthetic biology has emerged from the intersection of engineering and biology, with its emphasis on standardization, modularization and automation. The newly established Global Biofoundry Consortium, led by University of Illinois Professor Huimin Zhao, is investing in the systematized approach of engineering to touch off the next wave of biological discovery and innovation.

Genome-editing Proteins Seek and Find with a Slide and a Hop

Genome-editing Proteins Seek and Find with a Slide and a Hop

Searching a whole genome for one particular sequence is like trying to fish a specific piece from the box of a billion-piece puzzle. Using advanced imaging techniques, University of Illinois researchers have observed how one set of genome-editing proteins finds its specific targets, which could help them design better gene therapies to treat disease.

Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust Funds New Research Focus at IGB

Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust Funds New Research Focus at Institute for Genomic Biology

The Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust has awarded a $2 million grant to the Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Under the leadership of Principal Investigator Dr. Huimin Zhao and co-Principal Investigator Dr. Christopher Rao, the grant will be disbursed over two years to provide instrumentation and core facilities for a new research theme devoted to the new scientific subdiscipline of synthetic biology.

Subscribe to Zhao