Skip to main content

Illinois IGB

iGEM

Illinois team wins bronze at 2018 iGEM competition

November 16, 2018

The Illinois iGEM team won a bronze medal at the 2018 International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition for their work on the relationship between lactic acid bacteria and baker’s yeast.

The iGEM competition brings together undergraduate students from across the world to present their research in synthetic biology and compete for prizes.

The Illinois team was made up of five undergraduate students: Pranathi Karumanchi, Ziyu Wang, Liam Healy, Amie Bott and Alexander Ruzicka.


November 16, 2018


Related Articles

Illinois iGEM team takes on CABBI-funded synthetic biology project

August 2, 2018

This summer, a group of undergraduate students has teamed up with CABBI researchers to pursue an ambitious research project.

Their work is in preparation for the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition, which brings together undergraduate students from across the world to present their research in synthetic biology and compete for prizes.

This year’s team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is made up of five students: Pranathi Karumanchi, Ziyu Wang, Liam Healy, Amie Bott and Alexander Ruzicka.


August 2, 2018


Related Articles

UIUC_Illinois iGEM Team Claim Bronze at Annual Giant Jamboree in Boston

November 25, 2016

The University of Illinois International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) team recently endeavored to create an innovative promoter library that sought to provide researchers greater control of gene expression while liberating them from some of the constraint associated with the current categories of promoters. The Illinois team’s unique promoter library received a bronze medal at the annual iGEM Giant Jamboree this September.


November 25, 2016


Related Articles

iGEM team wins silver medal

May 10, 2015

Digital memory versus analog: it’s a question that’s plagued music lovers for years. In biology, however, the focus is overwhelmingly digital: 0 or 1, on or off, genes expressed or not expressed. But what would analog memory look like in a cell, and how might it be useful?


May 10, 2015


Related Articles

Undergraduate and Graduate

Learning Through Experience

Engaging in laboratory research at the undergraduate and graduate level brings significant benefits, not the least of which is the value of receiving real-world work experience both inside and outside the classroom. Students at the IGB shape their plans for a postgraduate career and build valuable, lasting professional networks, working as a member of a larger collaborative effort and interacting with fellow students and faculty.

Subscribe to iGEM