Skip to main content

Illinois IGB

Ripan Malhi

New grant awarded to study the importance of salmon to the Kenaitze Indian Tribe

September 24, 2022

A community-based project, conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in collaboration with the Kenaitze Indian Tribe and Kenai Peninsula College, has been awarded a $1,017,215 grant by the National Science Foundation. The project will map the use of salmon as a cultural keystone species of Dena’ina peoples.


September 24, 2022


Related Articles

New study investigates the microbiomes of dogs across the world

June 21, 2022

Although the microbiome—the collection of all microbes that live in the body—in the fecal matter of dogs has been investigated extensively, those studies have mostly been limited to domesticated dogs. In a new study, researchers have sampled the fecal microbiomes across diverse geographical populations to better understand what they look like around the world.


June 21, 2022


Related Articles

15 Years of IGB: Welcoming increased representation through DEI efforts

June 13, 2022

Scientific pursuits often require examining a problem from different angles in order to gain a complete understanding. Such an undertaking often requires multiple researchers, each with a unique skill set. But what happens when certain voices are ignored over and over, in favor of others? It breeds inequality that weakens our science and our sense of community.

DEI


June 13, 2022


Related Articles

Reducing the carbon footprint through single-use plastics reuse

February 25, 2022

A staggering 5.5 million tons of single-use plastics are generated each year by science labs, negating 83% of the world’s recycled plastics. A team at Illinois was recently awarded a $81,865 grant to reduce dependency on single-use plastics by developing protocols for plastics reuse.


February 25, 2022


Related Articles

Using a multipronged approach to investigate the diet of ancient dogs

February 24, 2021

Coprolites, or fossilized dog feces, are often used to understand the dietary preferences of ancient civilizations. However, the samples are often contaminated, making the analysis difficult. A new study, published in Scientific Reports, uses different techniques to improve the investigation of coprolites. 


February 24, 2021


Related Articles

Study tracks elephant tusks from 16th century shipwreck

December 17, 2020

In 1533, the Bom Jesus – a Portuguese trading vessel carrying 40 tons of cargo including gold, silver, copper and more than 100 elephant tusks – sank off the coast of Africa near present-day Namibia. The wreck was found in 2008, and scientists say they now have determined the source of much of the ivory recovered from the ship.


December 17, 2020


Related Articles

New IGB research theme takes closer look at protection of genomic data

September 18, 2019

Genomic technologies have the power to transform individual healthcare for the better. But with that power comes responsibility—the responsibility to protect the privacy of the individual and to make ethical choices that respect the rights of communities and populations.


September 18, 2019


Related Articles

Illinois, NIH host workshop on equity and diversity in genomic data science

September 13, 2019

The study of human genomics is inextricably linked to larger societal practices: how well diversity is represented in those who direct and conduct scientific research, how we balance data access with individual privacy, and the ways we group and describe both healthy and ill people. This September, the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) had the privilege of collaborating with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to host a workshop examining these issues.


September 13, 2019


Related Articles

Subscribe to Ripan Malhi