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where science meets society

Where Science Meets Society

Learn More About IGB

The Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) is an innovative research institute using cutting-edge genomic practices to tackle large-scale global challenges currently facing humanity.

Food security for a growing population. Effective therapeutic drugs and antibiotics. Automated synthesis of new molecules and proteins. Using a team-based, collaborative science approach, researchers at the IGB are addressing these and other complex issues. Our main areas of research below are each supported by our strong commitment to fundamental science – the pursuit of discovery.

Health & Wellness

Health +
Wellness

How the genome enhances, affects, or disrupts physical and mental wellbeing.

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Technology & Socety

Tech +
Society

Advancing our capability to shape the world and capacity to understand each other.

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Agriculture & Energy

Ag +
Energy

Sustainably feeding and fueling a planet impacted by a changing global climate.

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Outreach & Public Engagement

Outreach &
Public Engagement

Encouraging the public to understand how genomics affects daily life and society.

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May 2024

Spotlight

Image of the Month

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Featured Stories

The study team included, back row, from left, graduate student Rebecca Ultrich; chemistry professor Paul Hergenrother; Chris Fields, of the Roy J. Carver Biotechnology Center, research scientist Po-Chao Wen, graduate student Matt Sinclair; and, front row, from left, senior scientist Hyang Yeon Lee; Jessica Holmes, of the Roy J. Carver Biotechnology Center; and biochemistry professor Emad Tajkhorshid. (Study lead author Kristen Muñoz not pictured)
Full STEAM ahead for science! Another year of STEAM TRAIN comes to completion
The role of toe tapping behavior in poison frogs is poorly understood.
Aspergillus flavus is uniquely adapted to survive in bee colonies.
Composer and software developer Carla Scaletti and chemistry professor Martin Gruebele used sound to investigate hydrogen-bond dynamics during the protein-folding process.  Photo by Fred Zwicky
Left to right: Hua Wang and Rohit Bhargava